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TABLE SAW/JOINTER
Miter Cuts
Bevel Cuts
Compound Angles
Dado Accessory Joinery
Dadoes
Grooves
Other Dado Accessory Joinery
Additional Joinery
Saw Blade Joinery
Notching
Splines and Keys for Reinforcement
Tenons
Finger Joints
Lock Corner Joints
Joint Applications

Doing Jointery on Your Table Saw
Click here for a printer friendly version of Tip-
Pg. 1-3, Pg 4-6, Pg 7-9, Pg 10-12, Pg 13-15,
Pg 16-18,
Pg 19-21, Pg 22-24, Pg 25-27, Pg 28, Table 3-1

Tenons

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Figure 3-64. This is a true tenon. Its length should be 1/16" less than the depth of the mortise and its end should be chambered to allow room for excess glue.

The "true" tenon is shown in Figure 3-64. The tenon can be formed on the table saw with a dado accessory or by making multiple passes with a saw blade. Note: The "mortise," which is a rectangular cavity that receives the tenon, is cut with a mortising, routing or drilling accessory.

 

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Figure 3-65. You can produce a tenon with a saw blade if you make these four passes-two with the miter gauge and two against the fence.

The four-pass procedure illustrated in Figure 3-65 is generally used to form tenons. (This method can also be used to cut tongues.) Set the rip fence to, in effect, gauge the thickness of the projection. Make the first pass, and then make a second one after turning the stock end-for-end. Re-move the waste by working with the miter gauge. Since the last two cuts must match, gauge the stock's position by using a spacer block on the rip fence.

 

 

 

 

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Figure 3-66. The open tenon has only two shoulders. It and the slot it needs can be formed on the table saw.

 

The open tenon has only two shoulders. It and the slot it needs can also be formed on the table saw (Figure 3-66).

When forming tenons, the stock must be held on edge and components that require the cuts are often narrow, so the easiest and most accurate way to form tenons is to work with the Tenon Master Jig.

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Figure 3-67. Using the Tenon Master Jig to shape a tenon.

Form tenons by using a dado accessory or saw blade and working as shown in Figure 3-67. Once the Tenon Master has been correctly positioned, its position does not have to be changed. Make the first pass, turn the work so its opposite surface is against the face, and make a second pass. The work will be most secure when clamped to the face of the Tenon Master.

 

 

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Figure 3-68. You can form a slot by making repeat passes with a saw blade or by using a dado accessory.

Slots can be formed by using a dado accessory or by making repeat passes with a saw blade (Figure 3-68). This is also a good way to form the initial grooves in stock ends which will then be crosscut to produce splines. In addition, you can work this way for the first cut when doing a two-pass rabbet, the first cuts for tenons, and so on. When the cut or the size of the work requires it, make a special table insert and use it instead of the standard insert.

The Tenon Master can be used for operations like forming grooves in miter joints for splines or keys. It positions the workpiece at the correct angle and secures it so it can't move during the pass.

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Figure 3-69. The mating pieces are set and clamped in position like this to cut grooves for the keys.

To accurately cut grooves for keys be sure the trunnion is positioned correctly. The mating pieces of the miter joint are set and locked in place as shown in Figure 3-69. When you work this way, it isn't necessary for the grooves to be exactly centered. This same setup can be used to cut grooves for splines (Figure 3-70).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Figure 3-70. As long as the width and thickness of the stock permits it to be placed along the guides, the attachment can also be used to form spline grooves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to Finger Joints
Back to Splines and Keys for Reinforcement

 

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