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TABLE SAW/JOINTER
Miter Cuts
Bevel Cuts
Compound Angles
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Doing Jointery on Your Table Saw
Click here for a printer friendly version of Tip-
Pg. 1-3, Pg 4-6, Pg 7-9, Pg 10-12, Pg 13-15,
Pg 16-18,
Pg 19-21, Pg 22-24, Pg 25-27, Pg 28, Table 3-1

Bevel Cuts

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Figure 3-7. Some examples of how miter cuts can be used to form four-, six- and eight-sided projects.

Bevel cuts are made with the worktable positioned at an angle other than 90° to the blade. Slide the carriage and the power plant all the way to the right. This will allow you to move the workpiece freely across the table without interfering with the way tubes. The angle considerations that apply to miters also apply to cross miters and bevels (Figure 3-7). The cut angle is always one-half of the joint angle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crosscut Bevels

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Figure 3-8. Crosscut bevels are cut with the miter gauge at 90-degrees and with the table tilted.

To make a crosscut bevel, set the worktable at the desired angle and use the miter gauge to guide the workpiece (Figure 3-8). Mount the miter gauge on the downside of the table only. This will provide better support for the workpiece, help eliminate kickbacks, keep the miter gauge from hitting the blade, and keep your hands out of danger.

 

Rip Bevels

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Figure 3-9. Rip bevels are made with the table tilted and the workpiece usually riding against the rip fence.

A rip bevel is made with the table tilted, the workpiece usually riding against the rip fence (Figure 3-9). Warning: Mount the rip fence on the downside of the table to provide better support for the workpiece, help eliminate kick-back, and keep your hands out of danger. On the Model 500 there will be times when the width of a workpiece will prevent you from using the rip fence. If this is the case, clamp a long, straight board to the underside of the workpiece and rest this board over the upper edge of the table (Figure 3-10). If properly positioned, the board will guide the workpiece as accurately as a rip fence. If you have a Model 510, use the rip fence and the extension table system to support wide stock (Figure 3-11).

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Figure 3-10. To rip a bevel in a wide board clamp a long, straight board to the underside of the workpiece. Hook this board over the upper edge of the table and use it as a guide.

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Figure 3-11. When ripping a bevel in wide stock, use the rip fence and the extension table system (Model 510) to support the stock.

 

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Figure 3-12. Small segments can be assembled this way, using glue and a stapling gun. A band clamp or rubber bands can be used to hold the pieces until the glue dries.

Small, cross beveled or rip beveled segments are easy to assemble if you work as shown in Figure 3-12. Coat mating surfaces with glue and hold them tightly together as you drive staples to serve as "clamps." Use a band clamp or rubber bands after the assembly is complete to hold the pieces together until the glue is dry.

 

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Figure 3-13. Segments can be precut with straight sides and then beveled like this. Cut one side, turn stock end-for-end, and cut second side. The fence position is not changed.

A convenient way to cut beveled segments is shown in Figure 3-13. First cut the segments to the length and width you need. Set the table to the correct tilt and the fence to control the width of cut. Cut the bevel on one edge of the stock and then, without changing the setting, turn the stock end-for-end and bevel the second edge.

 

 

 

 

V-Cuts

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Figure 3-14. V-cuts are done in this manner. The cuts must meet at the bottom of the "V". The waste stock may be kicked back, so stand on either side of the blade.

V-shapes are formed by opposing bevel cuts that do not go through the stock and which meet to form an angle. Work as shown in Figure 3-14 when the "V" must be down the center of the stock. Set the saw blade's projection to the depth of the "V" needed. Set the rip fence so the center of the workpiece will match the topmost point of the saw blade. Make one pass and, after turning the stock end-for-end, make a second pass. Warning: Be sure to stand to one side when you make the second pass because the V-shaped waste piece might be kicked back toward the front of the table by the action of the saw blade.

V-cuts that are not centered are done almost the same way. The difference is that the rip fence must be relocated to position the workpiece for the second pass.

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