WoodworkingJointery.Com
Welcome to another FREE Woodworking Resource sponsored by your fellow
woodworkers at Shopsmith

TABLE SAW/JOINTER
Miter Cuts
Bevel Cuts
Compound Angles
Dado Accessory Joinery
Dadoes
Grooves
Other Dado Accessory Joinery
Additional Joinery
Saw Blade Joinery
Notching
Splines and Keys for Reinforcement
Tenons
Finger Joints
Lock Corner Joints
Joint Applications

Doing Jointery on Your Table Saw
Click here for a printer friendly version of Tip-
Pg. 1-3, Pg 4-6, Pg 7-9, Pg 10-12, Pg 13-15,
Pg 16-18,
Pg 19-21, Pg 22-24, Pg 25-27, Pg 28, Table 3-1

Saw Blade Joinery

Click to see larger view
Figure 3-47. Dadoes can be formed by making repeat passes with a saw blade.

By making repeat passes with the saw blade you can form dadoes, grooves and rabbets.

Dadoes-Figure 3-47 shows how to form a dada by making repeat passes with a saw blade. The first and second cuts form the shoulders of the dado. The material between the two cuts is removed by making overlapping passes. When the same cut is required on more than one piece, gauge the first and second cuts by using a stop block on the rip fence and miter gauge extension or stop rod. Warning: Never position the miter gauge stop rod so it crosses in front of the blade. Do the cuts in sequence on all pieces; that is, make the first cut on all pieces and then the second cut. This will ensure that the cuts will be similar and correctly located on all the work.

 

Click to see larger view
Figure 3-48. Repeat passes can also be used to form grooves in the edge of stock. When first and second cuts are made with opposite surfaces of the stock against the fence, the groove will be exactly centered. Use a rip fence extension and feather board for additional support.

Grooves-A repeat-pass groove is formed by working against the rip fence as diagrammed in Figure 3-48. Work this way to assure that the groove will be exactly centered. Mark the stock for the first cut; this will indicate the stock thickness that remains after the groove is formed. Set the fence so the outside of the blade will be on that line and make the first pass. Then, turn the stock end-for-end so the opposite surface will be against the fence, and make a second pass. If material remains between the two cuts you can clear it away by making additional passes. On jobs like this, and especially if the stock is thin, make a special insert so there will be ample support area for the stock around the cut area. Use a rip fence extension and a feather board for additional support.

Click to see larger view
Figure 3-49. A rabbet can be formed by a saw blade in this manner; (A) first pass, (B) second pass. Use a rip fence extension and a feather board for additional support.

Rabbets-While rabbets can be formed with a dado accessory as described earlier in this chapter, they can also be made with a saw blade by following the two steps shown in Figure 3-49.

Use a rip fence extension and a feather board for both steps. Warning: Avoid getting the waste stock caught between the rip fence extension and the blade on the second cut; otherwise, the waste may kick back. Plan ahead carefully.

Click to see larger view
Figure 3-50. When making a rabbet, first cut a kerf in the surface of the workpiece.

Cut the surface of the workpiece first (Figure 3-50). Then turn off the Mark V and readjust the position of the fence if necessary. Turn the workpiece on edge and make your second cut so that the waste is on the opposite side of the blade from the rip fence (Figure 3-51).

 

Click to see larger view
Figure 3-51. Turn the workpiece on edge and make the second cut. It's important that the waste doesn't get caught between the saw blade and the extension fence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to Notching
Back to Additional Joinery

 

Send For Your FREE Woodworking Fact Kit and "Sawdust Therapy" TV Show.

First Name*:
Last Name*:
Street Address*:
 
City*:
State*:
Zip*:
Country*:

USA Canada
Other

E-mail Address*:

  2009 Shopsmith Inc. All rights reserved.

Policies | Contact Us | Links | Corporate Web Site